Notes from my video link with my Tutor

My Tutor made four recommendations for my essay. One was simply a typo error the second was to refer to the various types of handmade drawings and the third and forth was to add some quotes to reinforce my statements.

From: – The idea that the camera ‘never lies’ started at the very beginning of photography, and the idea that a photograph was evidence to the truth was adopted for methods of identification and as accurate records of events. Good chance here to cite references However, these ideas were very quickly challenged as myths, photography had its limitations: At first, the time required for exposure was very long and unless objects remained perfectly still they either failed to be recorded or appeared as a blur on the paper. As the technology improved the photographers got more proficient and experimented with this new medium, and they learned how to manipulate their images. As photography became more main-stream, politicians recognised the potential of photography as a tool for their own agendas; both Stalin and Hitler recognised the potential of the photograph and used it to maximum effect.

To: – The idea that the camera ‘never lies’ started at the very beginning of photography with the Daguerreotype, and the idea that a photograph was evidence to the truth was adopted for methods of identification and as accurate records of events. All language must fall short of conveying any just idea of the truth, and this will not appear so wonderful when we reflect that the source of vision itself has been, in this instance, the designer. Perhaps, if we imagine the distinctness with an object is reflected in a positively perfect mirror, we come as near the reality as by any other means, the Daguerreotyped plate is infinitely (we use the term advisedly) in infinitely more accurate in its representation than any painting by human hands. (The Daguerreotype, Edgar Allan Poe, 1840.) (p.38, Trachtenberg, 1980). However, these ideas were very quickly challenged as myths, photography had its limitations: At first, the time required for exposure was very long and unless objects remained perfectly still they either failed to be recorded or appeared as a blur on the paper. As the technology improved the photographers got more proficient and experimented with this new medium, and they learned how to manipulate their images. As photography became more main-stream, politicians recognised the potential of photography as a tool for their own agendas; both Stalin and Hitler recognised the potential of the photograph and used it to maximum effect.

From:- ….It is not made from the same materials, a photograph is either made up of illuminated pixels on a display screen, or light sensitive chemicals on celluloid film and paper. Unlike, what it is representing, the photograph is flat, rendering in two dimensions. There are also three new elements added before the photograph can be produced: light, mechanics and chemical/digital interpretation. The final image on the photograph is only the reflected light, and the shadows. The closer you examine a photograph the less information it provides, the photograph breaks down into nothing more than specs of colour or grey. Opportunity for a good example here, Ruff, perhaps.

To: – ….It is not made from the same materials, a photograph is either made up of illuminated pixels on a display screen, or light sensitive chemicals on celluloid film and paper. Unlike, what it is representing, the photograph is flat, rendering in two dimensions. There are also three new elements added before the photograph can be produced: light, mechanics and chemical/digital interpretation. The final image on the photograph is only the reflected light, and the shadows. The closer you examine a photograph the less information it provides, the photograph breaks down into nothing more than specs of colour or grey. You will get nowhere, for instance, by taking a magnifying glass to it to get a closer look: you will see only patches of light and dark, an unreadable mesh of grains. The image yields nothing to the sort of scrutiny; it simply disappears. (p.395, Wells, 2003).

Published by shauncn512659

Hi, I am an OCA student studying for an Art degree in Photography , my student number is 512659. My e-mail is: shaun512659@oca.ac.uk

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