Summary for Part 1, Looking at Them – The Representation of the Other.

I began this section with a preliminary exercise as a kind ice breaker in which I took photographs of people incognito and this really reaffirmed my discomfort of street photography which I think has become much harder to practise in our modern society that is now always under the gaze of CCTV and the worldContinue reading “Summary for Part 1, Looking at Them – The Representation of the Other.”

Photographic Archival Intervention in the Edward Chambre-Hardman Collection.

Accessed, 24 July 2020. This is a very interesting lecture on the archive of the Liverpool photographer Edward Chambre-Hardman and how Keith W Roberts has set about cataloguing the photographic negatives and putting them together as a curator and exhibiting them. My own practice of archiving is very much in need of improving.

Human Rights Human Wrongs by Mark Sealy

Human Rights Human Wrongs The above link introduces Sealy photographic exhibition to quote: “Images can dehumanise us. They can make it easier to kill people,” says Mark Sealy, curator of Human Rights Human Wrongs, currently on exhibit at The Photographers’ Gallery “I grew up in Newcastle, sat on buses with characters calling me ‘Chalky’,” saysContinue reading “Human Rights Human Wrongs by Mark Sealy”

Reading Task – I.D. Photo.

The singular idea of the meaning of an I.D. photo is the passport head and shoulders, facing the camera composition; but this not the only method to establish a form of identification. When photographing people I will more often include more information this may be a full body shot or half to three quarters ofContinue reading “Reading Task – I.D. Photo.”

The ‘Other’ in the history of photography

Because photography was seen as the ideal tool for providing evidence due to its perceived indexicality, it was used to observe and record the face and head. In the 1850s and 1860s the British eugenicist Francis Galton obtained portrait photographs of criminals from the archive of Millbank Prison. He meticulously re-photographed theses pictures, exposing aContinue reading “The ‘Other’ in the history of photography”

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