The Cruel Radiance

The Cruel Radiance, 2012, Susie Linfield, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. ISBN: 978-0-226-48251-4. This is a very interesting book and I found it to be a good read. Linfield writes in defence of photography against what she describes as a popular and institutional attack on the medium by critics and even other photographers. SheContinue reading “The Cruel Radiance”

In Our Own Image.

In Our Own Image, 3rd Edition, 2010, by Fred Ritchin, New York: Aperture. ISBN:978-1-59711-164-5. This book was originally published under the title, The Coming Revolution in Photography, in the early 1990’s and was revised and republished in 2010. Ritchin’s topic for the book is his concern for the future of photography as a result ofContinue reading “In Our Own Image.”

Remembrance, The child I never was, by Annette Kuhn

Remembrance, The child I never was, (1991) by Annette Kuhn from The Photography Reader, edited by Liz Wells, (2003) Routledge, Abingdon. Annette Kuhn as a child, by Harry Kuhn, circa, early 1950’s, exact date unknown. Kuhn uses a photograph taken of herself as a child as the theme to her story or as she saysContinue reading “Remembrance, The child I never was, by Annette Kuhn”

Four image-repertoires – Roland Barthes

Roland Barthes writes in his book Camera Lucida (2000) London: Vintage Classics: The portrait-photograph is a closed field of forces. Four image-repertoires intersect here, oppose and distort each other. In front of the lens, I am at the same time: the one I think I am, the one I want others to think I am,Continue reading “Four image-repertoires – Roland Barthes”

Summary for Part 1, Looking at Them – The Representation of the Other.

I began this section with a preliminary exercise as a kind ice breaker in which I took photographs of people incognito and this really reaffirmed my discomfort of street photography which I think has become much harder to practise in our modern society that is now always under the gaze of CCTV and the worldContinue reading “Summary for Part 1, Looking at Them – The Representation of the Other.”

Human Rights Human Wrongs by Mark Sealy

Human Rights Human Wrongs The above link introduces Sealy photographic exhibition to quote: “Images can dehumanise us. They can make it easier to kill people,” says Mark Sealy, curator of Human Rights Human Wrongs, currently on exhibit at The Photographers’ Gallery “I grew up in Newcastle, sat on buses with characters calling me ‘Chalky’,” saysContinue reading “Human Rights Human Wrongs by Mark Sealy”

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