Picture This How Pictures Work

Picture This How Pictures Work, 2000, Molly Bang, San Francisco: Chronicle Books LLC. ISBN: 978-1-58717-030-0. I purchased this book in my charity shop. This is a great little book that takes you back to basics. Using just shapes and colours, Molly Bang deconstructs composition and examines each element that makes a good picture work. TheContinue reading “Picture This How Pictures Work”

Sexuality, Documents of Contemporary Art.

Amelia Jones, (ed.) (2014) Sexuality, Documents of Contemporary Art, London: Whitechapel Art Gallery. ISBN: 978-0-85488-224-3. This book is a collection of essays and interviews. Many of the artists are involved in performance art in which they will either perform in front of a live audience or video their work. Much of the discussion is inContinue reading “Sexuality, Documents of Contemporary Art.”

Self Image, Personal is political (1979) by Angela Kelly

Women’s Identity (1975 – 1979) Angela Kelly This essay, Kelly examines the use and mis-use of self portraiture, to quote Kelly: to determine what relevance a seemingly private practice has to a public audience. (p.410, Wells, 2003). Kelly suggests in her essay, that at the time of writing, self-portraiture had not been properly analysed. AsContinue reading “Self Image, Personal is political (1979) by Angela Kelly”

Remembrance, The child I never was, by Annette Kuhn

Remembrance, The child I never was, (1991) by Annette Kuhn from The Photography Reader, edited by Liz Wells, (2003) Routledge, Abingdon. Annette Kuhn as a child, by Harry Kuhn, circa, early 1950’s, exact date unknown. Kuhn uses a photograph taken of herself as a child as the theme to her story or as she saysContinue reading “Remembrance, The child I never was, by Annette Kuhn”

Summary for Part 3, “Look at Me!” – The Representation of Self.

In section 3, “Look at Me!”, I studied the subject of ‘self’ and how it has and is used and interpreted in the portrait. I learned that the idea of the ‘selfie’ goes back beyond photography. Originally the early selfies where exclusively for the rich and powerful to express wealth and more importantly, power, examplesContinue reading “Summary for Part 3, “Look at Me!” – The Representation of Self.”

Exercise 2.6 – Candid Portrait

Working with my friend Graham, I set-up a basic studio with a barstool and a white background, I directed his poses using my camera fixed to a tripod. After 5 minutes I gave the control of the photographic direction to Graham, who firstly wanted me to take the camera off the tripod and then photographContinue reading “Exercise 2.6 – Candid Portrait”

Questioning Identity: Gender, Class, Nation.

Kath Woodward, (ed.) (2000) Questioning Identity: Gender, Class, Nation, London: Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-22288-5. This publication is part a series of books for the study of social science through the Open University, published in 2000 it is probably a little dated now as it pulls from examples no later than the 1990s. however, as a bookContinue reading “Questioning Identity: Gender, Class, Nation.”

Reading Task – White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack​ by Peggy McIntosh.

White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack​ by Peggy McIntosh. (1988) Notes and Quotes McIntosh starts her essay discussing how men have more power and privilege over women and that although men may accept that women are not treated equally to men, few men would agree that they are over privileged and should give some of itContinue reading “Reading Task – White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack​ by Peggy McIntosh.”

Exercise 2.5 – Privileged

As a photographer, I can be often if not always in a position privilege over my sitter. model or subject. The very term subject implies that the photographer has consciously or unconsciously taken the privileged higher position. The photographer has the privileged position of observer. The photographer has the privileged position of control. As photographerContinue reading “Exercise 2.5 – Privileged”

Exercise 2.4 – Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa

Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa position appears to be one of prejudice, based on history, perhaps before writing his scathing critic he should have first contacted the artist to clarify their position, rather than simply damning their work. I believe Hoek’s intentions were honourable and as he points out as photographers and artist work can be about theContinue reading “Exercise 2.4 – Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa”

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