Assignment 6 – Final Project

Behind this laughing mask of mine 2020 – 2021 ‘Every profound spirit needs a mask’ Nietzsche, Beyond Good an Evil, 1888. In the politics of self we put up a front to others, and this is worn as a type of mask that projects as well as it guards. For identity we wear many masksContinue reading “Assignment 6 – Final Project”

In Our Own Image.

In Our Own Image, 3rd Edition, 2010, by Fred Ritchin, New York: Aperture. ISBN:978-1-59711-164-5. This book was originally published under the title, The Coming Revolution in Photography, in the early 1990’s and was revised and republished in 2010. Ritchin’s topic for the book is his concern for the future of photography as a result ofContinue reading “In Our Own Image.”

Summary for Part 4, Essay.

For part four, I have chosen for my essay the topic: ‘From case studies, can single images ever fairly represent others or self?’ Assignment 4 Planing and Preparation for assignment. In my research for my fourth assignment, I came across an essay by Jo Spence that was published in, Spare Rib, March, 1978. In thisContinue reading “Summary for Part 4, Essay.”

Planning and Preparing for Assignment 4

For my essay I chose “Using case studies, discuss whether single images can ever fairly represent others or self? I began by looking through my books for appropriate essays that has explored this subject and I took notes of book titles and page numbers to refer back to in preparation for the essay. From thisContinue reading “Planning and Preparing for Assignment 4”

After You Dearest Photography, Reflections on the work of Francesca Woodman (1998) By David Lee Strauss

Francesca Woodman, Self-portrait, (1977) Strauss looks at the work by the artist Francesca Woodman, many of her pictures were self portraits. Sadly Woodman took her own life, whilst still only 22 years old. This latter fateful knowledge cannot help influencing the way we view her art. Because these are photographs, “evidence of a novel kind,”Continue reading “After You Dearest Photography, Reflections on the work of Francesca Woodman (1998) By David Lee Strauss”

Reading Photographs – In Our Own Image, by Fred Ritchin

Peter Kennard and Cat Phillips created the image, titled: Photo Op, in 2005. From Fred Ritchin’s book, In Our Own Image, his essay, Reading Photographs, (Ritchin, 2010) discusses the authenticity of a photograph. He asks, …after all that is happening in computer imaging can one safeguard the integrity of the photograph in its populist roleContinue reading “Reading Photographs – In Our Own Image, by Fred Ritchin”

The ‘Mona Lisa’ by Leonardo da Vinci 1503/06 – 1517

Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci (1503/07 – 1517) This portrait is now probably the most famous portrait in the world. Painted by Leonardo da Vinci, he started painting this from around 1503 – 06 and is believed to have continued working on it until as late as 1517, close to his death. It isContinue reading “The ‘Mona Lisa’ by Leonardo da Vinci 1503/06 – 1517”

‘Facing Up To Myself’ by Jo Spence (1978)

Jo Spence, Photo Therapy: Infantilization, 1984. The above link (accessed, 26/10/2020) is a pdf copy of an article published in Spare Rib magazine, March 1978 by Jo Spence, Facing Up To Myself (1978). Available from https://journalarchives.jisc.ac.uk/home (accessed 26/10/2020). Notes: As a photographer, Jo Spence, realised, That a single image could not convey someone’s essence. (SpareContinue reading “‘Facing Up To Myself’ by Jo Spence (1978)”

Human Rights Human Wrongs by Mark Sealy

Human Rights Human Wrongs The above link introduces Sealy photographic exhibition to quote: “Images can dehumanise us. They can make it easier to kill people,” says Mark Sealy, curator of Human Rights Human Wrongs, currently on exhibit at The Photographers’ Gallery “I grew up in Newcastle, sat on buses with characters calling me ‘Chalky’,” saysContinue reading “Human Rights Human Wrongs by Mark Sealy”

The ‘Other’ in the history of photography

Because photography was seen as the ideal tool for providing evidence due to its perceived indexicality, it was used to observe and record the face and head. In the 1850s and 1860s the British eugenicist Francis Galton obtained portrait photographs of criminals from the archive of Millbank Prison. He meticulously re-photographed theses pictures, exposing aContinue reading “The ‘Other’ in the history of photography”

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